Category Archives: Therapies

A list of the therapies offered by Milltown Physiotherapy clinic

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Dr. Jan Dommerholt visits Milltown Physiotherapy sharing advances in dry needling

We were delighted to host renowned myofascial and chronic pain expert physiotherapist Dr. Jan Dommerholt for a course on dry needling in back and pelvic pain on Wednesday the 30th of November.

Dr. Dommerholt is a Dutch trained physio and a recognised expert in the physiotherapy diagnosis and treatment of persons with myofascial pain syndrome, chronic pain syndromes, and whiplash associated disorders. He has published several books, over 60 articles, and nearly 40 chapters in medical and physical therapy textbooks on myofascial pain, chronic pain conditions, fibromyalgia, complex regional pain syndrome, and whiplash.

If you’d like to know more about this therapy please have a look at our dry needling section http://milltownphysiotherapy.com/therapies/dry-needling/

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Renowned specialist reveals alarming rate of hip injuries among top GAA players

Leading orthopaedic hip surgeon Patrick Carton said that the average age for surgery has dropped from 31 to 26 years of age in recent times, and he’s putting that down to the intensity of training that causes progressive damage to the hip joint. It comes back to picking up this diagnosis at an early stage. Sometimes players don’t know they have a problem.
Carton explained how it’s not uncommon for players to arrive to his surgery seeking hip repair work, but that the damage is too great and hip replacement is the only option.

In those cases, players are forced to retire from contact sport and Carton says that he’s operating every week “on ex footballers or hurlers in their 30s and 40s.”

http://www.the42.ie/hip-injuries-gaa-patrick-carton-3068419-Nov2016/

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World Physiotherapy Day This Week


Physical therapists help add life to years

Physical therapists can help older people to be independent, improving quality of life and reducing health care costs. This is the message from thousands of physical therapists across the world as they prepare to take part in World Physical Therapy Day on 8th September 2016.

Every year, World Physical Therapy Day allows individual physical therapists and WCPT member organisations to celebrate their contribution to global health. This year’s event builds on the success of 2015, when thousands of physical therapists used the #worldptday hashtag on Twitter to unite events across the world.
This World Physical Therapy Day uses the theme “Add life to years” and the hashtag #addlifetoyears, following the World Health Organisation’s World Report on Ageing and Health which says that “maintenance of functional ability has the highest importance” for older people.

The World Confederation for Physical Therapy played a significant role in the consultations for the new WHO ageing and health strategy. “World Physical Therapy Day is the first opportunity since the adoption of the report for physical therapists to show how important the profession is in ensuring healthy and active older people,” says WCPT President Emma Stokes.
“The evidence of the clinical and cost-effectiveness of physical therapy for older adults is incontrovertible. World Physical Therapy Day, with its focus on adding life to years, gives physical therapists a great platform to communicate this message to older people, the wider community and health care policy and decision-makers.”

By 2050 the global population will include two billion people aged 60 or over, and 400 million aged 80 or over. Physical therapists have a key role in helping people with long-term conditions achieve their goals, fulfil their potential and participate fully in society.
“Every day frontline physical therapists are transforming lives through the application of their clinical skills and experience. This is particularly so when working with older people whose health needs increase as they age”, says WCPT Chief Executive Officer Jonathon Kruger.
“Enabling older people to maintain their independence and continue to participate in society is a key skill of physical therapists around the world. In the coming years these skills will be more in demand and the global profession is willing and able to meet that challenge.”

For more information, contact your national physical therapy organisation (see www.wcpt.org/members), see the resources at www.wcpt.org/wptday-toolkit or email Mia Lockner at mlockner@wcpt.org

Background information

    About physical therapy
    Physical therapists (known in many countries as physiotherapists) are experts in developing and maintaining people’s ability to move and function throughout their lives. With an advanced understanding of how the body moves and what keeps it from moving well, they promote wellness, mobility and independence. They treat and prevent many problems caused by pain, illness, disability and disease, sport and work related injuries, ageing and inactivity.

    Physical therapists are educated over several years, giving them a full knowledge of the body’s systems and the skills to treat a wide range of problems. This education is usually university-based, at a level that allows physical therapists to practise independently. Continuing education ensures that they keep up to date with the latest advances in research and practice. Many physical therapists are engaged in research themselves.

    More detailed information about what physical therapists do can be found on WCPT’s website: www.wcpt.org/policy/ps-descriptionPT.

    Campaign resources
    WCPT has pulled together a collection of additional resources on ageing including research supporting the role of physical therapy in promoting quality of life in older people and information for the public: http://www.wcpt.org/wptday-resources.

    About World Physical Therapy Day
    World Physical Therapy Day falls on 8th September every year, and is an opportunity for physical therapists from all over the world to raise awareness about their crucial role in keeping people well, mobile and independent. The day was established by WCPT in 1996, and marks the date on which WCPT was founded in 1951. More details and toolkit at: www.wcpt.org/wptday.

    About the World Confederation for Physical Therapy
    WCPT is the profession’s global body representing over 350,000 physical therapists/physiotherapists from member organisations in 114 countries. More information: www.wcpt.org.

Paralympics Rio 2016 – Ireland’s gold medal chances

The Paralympics are starting two weeks today – Wednesday the 7th of September.

Check out Channel Four’s incredible trailer for the games. Unfortunately there are major budget cuts ahead of the games with downsizing of Rio 2016 workforce, reduced transport services for athletes and closure of some media centres. So please help spread the word!

I’m really looking forward to seeing Michael McKillop in the 800m and 1500m, Noelle Lenihan the world record holder in the discus and Jason Smyth in the 100m – the Usain Bolt of the Paralympics.

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World Continence Week and Overactive Bladder (OAB)

One in three women experience urinary leakage.

Just under 60% of women who never had a baby have had some sort of pelvic floor symptoms – this may be bladder or bowel control, pelvic organ prolapse or sexual pain.

15% of Irish people experience overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms.

Half of Irish people don’t understand OAB.

90% avoid visiting their doctor for help when the condition first occurs.

Irish research shows that 22% of Irish people claim they would either do nothing or are unsure of what to do if they experience OAB symptoms – and almost 1 in 3 report embarrassment as the key barrier to seeking help for OAB.

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To mark World Continence Week 2016 Irish experts shared tips on improving bladder control encouraging the public to take action and improve their bladder control.

Specialist Chartered Physiotherapist In Womens’s Health & Continence Maeve Whelan went to Jumpzone and with a group talked about the pros and cons of pelvic floor exercising on a trampoline!

 

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Trampolining is not for the feint hearted! The problem is that those who have real problems wouldn’t dare. The majority of women would think that they could n’t get up on a trampoline for even a minute, let alone stay there long enough to strenghten the pelvic floor.

 

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN IT GOES WRONG?

Every time you land on the trampoline, your pelvic floor has to contract to keep everything in place. Yes – if you have problems with bladder leakage, it might increase your symptoms. . The bounce generates a lot of intra-abdominal pressure, and if your muscles are too weak – you’ll leak.

 

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Think of a ship in dry dock: the organs (bladder, uterus and bowel) keep going down and the support (the muscles or in this analogy the water) is not there to counteract that force. The neck of the bladder opens.

 

However – you are up there with the highly trained:

  • 80% of elite trampolinists have pelvic floor leakage
  • 28% of all athletes have pelvic floor leakage

 

WHAT DO I DO ?

Learn how to do a  CORRECT PELVIC FLOOR CONTRACTION:

  • Squeeze engaging from the back as well and up to the front across the vagina and towards bladder
  • Lift up and in as if trying to stop passing wind and stop passing urine
  • Don’t lift your chest & don’t squeeze buttocks
  • Start by holding for 5 and drop completely
  • Then progress to hold for longer and introduce breathing at the same time
  • Do 10 reps x 3 times per day
  • Do some in lying some in sitting and some in standing

 

Engage your core muscles

 

  • Zip up lower tummy as if away from knicker elastic or tummy button to spine
  • DON’T brace the tummy – that means you shouldn’t feel a popping out of the muscles under the ribs
  • DON’T lift your chest
  • Engage the pelvic floor muscles
  • Practice with the pelvic floor 10 reps x 3 times per day

 

Posture

 

  • Lift the chest – make sure you are not rounded at the middle back
  • Use the buttocks to stand– don’t sag down at the pelvis
  • Don’t brace the upper tummy

 

HOLD while bouncing – Some gentle rebounding – your feet don’t even have to leave the surface at first and build up impact all the time working on contracting the pelvic floor at impact.

 

Be careful – don’t over brace the core or the pelvic floor – you might leak more.

 

BUT Conscious, active “zipping” of the core is only required when you are increasing your activity levels – bouncing, lifting, running, pushing, bending, weight training etc.

 

DON’T FALL IN TO THE TRAP

 

  • Oh well I have had a baby – that’s the way it is now
  • I thought it was the menopause – it’s the hormones
  • Oh well I am too old – its too late for me

70-80% of women will do well with bladder retraining and pelvic floor exercises – have a look at http://www.oab.ie .

 

FINALLY – TRY EVB SPORT SHORTS FOR EXTRA SUPPORT http://evbsport.com  !

 

 

 

Sleep

What is the best sleeping position for pain relief?

 

We all know the importance of getting a good nights sleep. Evidence has shown that having our sleep interrupted, even when not in pain, can make people more sensitive to pain (Smith et al 2007).

 

We often get asked here in Milltown Physiotherapy what is the best sleeping position for my neck, shoulder, lower back or hip pain. Well the Cleveland Clinic have come up with a nice handy graphic that helps illustrate the best and worst sleeping positions for your pain.

Click here for full graphic

 

References:

Smith MT, Edwards RR, McCann UD, Haythornthwaite JA. The effects of sleep deprivation on pain inhibition and spontaneous pain in women. Sleep. 2007;30(4):494–505. PubMed #17520794.

 

 

 

 

Exercising as you age – reduce falls risk and improve independence!

Muscle maintain

A great picture showing the difference between someone who exercises regularly and a sedentary person.

Research has shown that by staying active and exercising as you get older you can maintain muscle mass.

As you age, exercise helps protects your bones, joints and muscles. It also reduces risk of falling, increases independence. Studies have also found it can boost memory and help prevent dementia.

If you are unsure as to how you can begin an exercise program, there are a lot of gyms that provide pay as you go service that can advise you.

Also if you are a bit older and feeling apprehensive about exercise. Older In Ireland is a good organisation that helps people become more active.

http://olderinireland.ie/

As ever if you haven’t exercised for some time and you have health concerns, you may want to talk to your doctor before starting a new exercise routine

 

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What happened to O’Connell’s hamstring?

A great win last weekend by Ireland over France with plenty of bodies on the line. It was very sad to see Paul O’Connell’s injury.

The hamstring avulsion (tearing of the tendon from the bone) he likely suffered will keep him out of action for up to 6 months. With Paul having signed with Toulon for 2 seasons, and the French Top 14 season finishes in May, it is looking likely that he will be targeting next season for his return to action.

This is a great piece by chartered physiotherapist Michelle Biggins that illustrates the severity of his injury.

O’Connell’s injury