Tennis Elbow – to inject or not to inject?

A really nice infographic courtesy of Professor Bill Vicenzino and Clinical Edge on tennis elbow. He looks at the treatment options, but also what the long term outcomes are post injection which makes for some interesting reading.

To Inject

We also must really recommend the Clinical Edge website which is a great resource for physiotherapists, helping to make current research nice and easy to bring into clinical practice.

Dublin Marathon – Congrats Gráinne

Congratulations to our chartered physiotherapist Gráinne Wall who completed the Dublin Marathon on Sunday. Despite hitting the wall on mile 22, she finished in a great time. With her first marathon now under her belt she says she can’t wait to sign up again for next year. Registration for the 2018 Dublin marathon opens up tomorrow!

Well done Grainne!

Grainne

 

New pre run

Milltown Physiotherapy finish top 10 in Twilight Challenge 5km

The Spirit Motor Group Twilight Team Challenge took place in Sandyford yesterday evening for the 4th year running. This team event has become a focal point of the year in the workplaces of south Dublin. Over 600 runners, joggers and walkers signed for this late evening race under street lights. The night race under street lights certainly added to a great atmosphere. This race was hosted by DSD AC who provided runners with a great night of entertainment and fun running. The title sponsors Spirit Motor Group provided a fabulous HQ where participants were very well looked after with catering and refreshments.

 

Before Run

Helen, Eimear, Frank and Tara represented Milltown Physiotherapy and managed to survive the thundering wind and a few steep hills to come out in 10th place out of nearly 40 teams. It was a great event, and extremely enjoyable.

 

Last min prep

If you are looking to get involved in running, or are just starting out we would recommend speaking to a physiotherapist – the movement specialist to help you avoid common running injuries.

A great timed event held in parks across the country for free is the 5km parkrun. You can find further details on www.parkrun.ie on how to register. The event caters for walkers, joggers and runners. Get out there!

Physical activity

World Physiotherapy Day 8th September

World Physiotherapy Day was on 8th September and a survey to mark the occasion by the Irish Society of Chartered Physiotherapists showed that 2/3 of Irish Adults are not active enough with the shock headline: Sitting is the new smoking.

What does this mean

The main findings were that over 55s are outperforming all younger age groups in time spent at physical activity. However they are not getting it completely right needing to do more resistance exercise to increase quality of life in later years. The survey suggested that 18-24 year olds may be the most physically inactive amongst all adults.

New recommendations on Physical Activity levels (BMJ 2016) demonstrate that the maximum health benefits from physical activity can be achieved by getting between 3000 and 4000 MET mins of activity per week. The MET min is a unit that describes volumes of physical activity. Sixty MET mins equates to the energy consumed by sitting quietly for 1 hour. The 18-24 year olds surveyed were just expending 1496 MET mins per week while the total population was expending 2137 MET mins per week.

Physical inactivity

Physical inactivity is the fourth leading factor in global mortality and is responsible for 6% of deaths around the world. Other health benefits from engaging in more physical activity include decreased risk of:

  • Colon cancer by 30 -40 %
  • Breast cancer by 20- 30%
  • Cardio vascular disease by 20-35%
  • Type 2 Diabetes by 20-30%
  • Stroke by 20%

The suggested target for older adults (>65) is 30 minutes of moderate physical activity at least five times per week in bouts of 10 minutes or more. 30 minutes of brisk walking or the equivalent five days a week is often recommended. In addition, physical activity to improve strength should be done at least two days a week.

Some people can find it difficult to reach this level of activity but making modest increases in your time standing and spending less time sitting can have a positive effective.

There are associations between increased physical activity and reduction in musculoskeletal conditions such as osteoarthritis, osteoporosis and better cognitive acuity and mental health.

Our clinic at the event

Physical activity

On World Physiotherapy Day at Milltown Physiotherapy we set up an information area for everyone passing through that day and gave out a copy of the two WPD infographics to take away. We measured grip strength to promote the idea of needing to do strength training on two days per week. We compared grip strength against norms in age categories and did a draw for free physiotherapy sessions giving prizes to four strong winners. They all had a story to tell as to why their grip was in the ‘strong’ category. We gave a few people frights too!

post-natal-pilates

Should you exercise while pregnant?

Women with uncomplicated pregnancies should be encouraged to engage in aerobic and strength-conditioning exercises before, during, and after pregnancy. Regular physical activity helps with weight management, reduces the risk of gestational diabetes in obese women, and enhances psychological well-being.  An exercise program that leads to an eventual goal of moderate-intensity exercise for at least 20–30 minutes per day on most or all days of the week should be developed and adjusted as medically indicated.

Here at Milltown Physiotherapy we offer ante and post natal Pilates classes for women from 16 weeks pregnant and from 6-8 weeks post natal. Women can enjoy Pilates in comfort and safety, knowing they are exercising correctly under the care of a Chartered Physiotherapist with experience in Women’s Health. Click here for further information on our classes

 

 

  • Swimming, walking, modified Yoga, stationary bike and low impact aerobics are all safe exercises in pregnancy. Some Yoga positions should be avoided later in pregnancy. Avoid Hot Yoga.
  • If you were lifting weights before you got pregnant, keep going as long as you go easy. Avoid heavy weights or routines where you have to lie flat on your back.
  • High intensity sports: If you regularly run or play tennis, you don’t need to stop. As you get closer to your due date, run on flat, groomed surfaces to reduce impact and avoid falls.
  • Risky Sports are the contact sports such as basketball, hockey, and soccer and activities that increase your risk of falling, such as off road cycling, roller-skating, downhill skiing, and horseback riding.

 

In consultation with your doctor running, jogging, racquet sports and strength training may be safe for pregnant women who participated in these activities regularly before pregnancy (ACOG 2015).

 

Engage your core i.e. your abdominals pelvic floor with impact or you might leak, get pelvic girdle pain or low back pain. If you are not sure how to do this find a Chartered Physiotherapist in your area.

 

When to slow down: As long as you can talk comfortably and aren’t short of breath while exercising, you’re moving at a good pace. Don’t exert yourself to the point of heavy sweating. Drink plenty of fluids. If you have any of the following symptoms, stop exercising and call your doctor right away:

  • Contractions
  • Chest pain
  • Dizziness
  • Calf pain or swelling
  • Less movement by the baby
  • Headache
  • Muscle weakness
  • Fluid leaking from the vagina
  • Vaginal bleeding

 

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Womens’s Health Care Physicians Number 650 • December 2015