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Paediatric Physiotherapy at Milltown Physiotherapy

1. Aisling, our paediatric physiotherapist here at Milltown has recently completed an intensive week’s training led by the world-renowned specialist physiotherapist in Neuro-Developmental Training (NDT) for children, Lois Bly. The training allowed Aisling to develop her skills in understanding the intricate, subtle components of typical and atypical movement development in babies, toddlers and older children, and recognise compensations and deviations from typical development. These deviations would commonly be displayed in conditions such as:
• Co-ordination disorders
• Hypermobility
• Developmental Delay
• Musculoskeletal complaints such as flat feet, in-toeing, hip dysplasia
• Brain injury

Children with such issues can sometimes find themselves on long waiting lists for therapy assessments and treatment.
Aisling is continually putting these skills into practice here at Milltown and is happy to liaise with parents who would be interested in their child having an assessment and treatment with her so that they can start to work immediately on these deviations at home, in school or in crèche to allow their child to reach their full potential. Aisling works Monday to Friday and her hours include pre and post-school times to help fit in with busy family schedules.

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Vestibular Assessment at Milltown Physiotherapy

Here is Laura Fitzpatrick our physiotherapist with a special interest in Vestibular Assessment giving us the low down on BPPV (benign paroxysmal positional vertigo), one of the most common causes of dizziness/spinning/vertigo.
It is a condition that she treats regularly at the clinic with great outcomes. Vestibular assessment is a special interest area of physiotherapy. It deals with dizziness and balance issues primarily.

What is BPPV?

BPPV is a condition arising in the inner ear. It is a sudden but short-lived sensation of spinning when your head is in a certain position, for eg. turning in bed or going from sitting to lying.
The dizziness can range from being mild to severe and there is normally a sudden onset of symptoms- one day you have no dizziness and the next you do.

Signs that you may have BPPV.

Nausea with or without vomiting associated with your spinning
Mild to severe spinning when you have your head in certain positions
A feeling of unsteadiness
Difficulty with balance

The spinning/dizzy sensation normally only lasts for a few seconds but sometimes can continue while your head remains in a certain position.

BPPV is not normally a serious condition, however it can be very worrying, so do seek treatment if you are concerned.

More women than men are affected by BPPV and having had a head injury can make you more susceptible to BPPV.

What causes BPPV?

Very often there is no known cause for your symptoms arising. This is known as idiopathic BPPV. Sometimes it coincides with an episode of illness, like a viral infection. It can also be caused by having your head in unusual positions like on the dentist chair.

Our ears play a major role in BPPV. We have 3 small canals in each of our ears, these are called semi-circular canals. These canals monitor the rotation of our head and help to tell us what way our head is positioned.

We also have tiny crystals in our inner ears which help make our bodies sensitive to gravity.
These crystals can become dislodged and end up in our semi-circular canals. This is what causes your spinning/dizziness. The canals have now become sensitive to movements that they would not normally respond to.

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Diagnosis and treatment

When you come for your assessment your physiotherapist will first take a complete history of your symptoms. They may ask about your cardiac history and about things like migraines, headaches and your hearing. This is to help rule out any other reason for your dizziness. If you have results of recent investigations like a brain CT or MRI, make sure to bring them with you to your assessment.

Then a number of tests will be performed on you to ascertain whether or not you have BPPV.

Once you have been diagnosed with BPPV your physiotherapist will then perform a repositioning manoeuvre. The aim of this is to reposition the crystals so that your semi-circular canals are no longer over sensitive to normal movements.This repositioning involves a number of specific head movements held for a certain amount of time. You should notice that your symptoms are much better with the re-test that will be carried out at the end of your assessment.

We do ask that you bring someone along with you to your assessment.

BPPV is just one of many vestibular conditions that can be treated with vestibular physiotherapy. Please ring the clinic if you would like any further information or to book an appointment.

World Physiotherapy Day September 2018

It’s World Physiotherapy Day this Saturday, and the theme this year is Mental Health, Phyisotherapy and Exercise.
Did you know that 20% of people living with osteoarthritis have depression or anxiety?
Exercise improves the quality of life and self-esteem of people experiencing mental health
issues and has a large and significant antidepressant effect in people with depression.

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Improving MH

Ankle Sprain

Did you know that 1 in 3 ankle sprains are actually re-sprains. Within the first year your risk of re-spraining your ankle is twice as high!

A physiotherapist can help with balance exercises which have been shown to reduce the risk of re-spraining your ankle by as much as 40%.

A lovely infographic here by Kasper Janssen published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

 

BJSM Ankle

Exercise isn’t harmful for people with knee osteoarthritis

“Advice to rest and avoid pain is commonly provided to people with knee and other joint pains. This advice is often wrong, and harmful. Inactivity and rest makes pain and osteoarthritis worse, not better in the longer term. Our joints need movement and exercise to stimulate repair and keep them strong. There is undisputable evidence that staying active and regular participation in exercise is safe and will help improve pain, and a person’s quality of life”

Some great work here by physiotherapist Dr. Christian Barton

Watch the video below from a patient’s perspective.
Myth Busted Exercise helps

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